Recent Changes

Thursday, December 1

  1. page Panel of Experts edited ... Årstaskolan/Stockholm Sweden Liv Klakegg Dahlin University College of Oslo and Akershus N…
    ...
    Årstaskolan/Stockholm
    Sweden
    Liv Klakegg Dahlin
    University College of Oslo and Akershus
    Norway

    Magdi Engelstoft el-Toukhy
    Hippomini + Member of LFS (The National Organization of Social Education)
    (view changes)
    8:25 am

Wednesday, November 30

  1. page Challenges edited ... Nordic schools do not look to practices from other parts of society and industry as often as t…
    ...
    Nordic schools do not look to practices from other parts of society and industry as often as they should. Modernising education will require school leaders to analyse how other sectors have adapted to remain relevant, and also to learn from their mistakes. For example, the music industry underwent a complete overhaul when applications like iTunes U and Spotify emerged. Scandinavian schools have an opportunity to refine their organisational models to remain more agile. In the business of education, the consumers are the students, and there is a need to better cater to them as their expectations and behaviours evolve.jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016
    Integrating Technology in Teacher Education
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    As teachers begin to realize that they are limiting their students by not helping them to develop and use digital competence skills across the curriculum, the lack of formal training is being offset through professional development or informal learning, but digital media literacy is not yet the norm. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital literacy is less about tools and more about thinking, and thus skills and standards based on tools and platforms have proven to be somewhat ephemeral. 21st Century teachers needs skills such as web editing, cloud storage and sharing solutions, social media, presentation software, and general multimedia. The teacher education need to invest in - and implement - long term ongoing training in digital skills. If we do not invest in their education, most teachers will never be able to keep up with the rapidly evolving digital technologies. ingrid.vinje Nov 4, 2016helle.mathiasen Nov 13, 2016stefan.reppe Nov 13, 2016marie.tangden Nov 14, 2016jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016 helena.kvarnsell Nov 15, 2016 ellen.k.fossvoll Nov 15, 2016LREM Nov 15, 2016 jakob.harder Nov 16, 2016 Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    One very important part of ICT literacy is networking skills. We don't learn things so much at classes or seminars anymore. They, too are more for networking than for learning. If we want to update our knowledge and keep up with the changes and developments in ICT, it's essential to be connected and belong to proper networks. In the new Finnish core curriculum, teachers are obliged to get networked (even internationally) and help their students to get connected internationally. Professional learning networks developing to learning communities are the most important teacher training instruments in the future. tiinsari Nov 16, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    (view changes)
    3:07 am
  2. page Challenges edited ... tiinsari Oct 19, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016 Balancing our Con…
    ...
    tiinsari Oct 19, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016
    Balancing our Connected and Unconnected Lives
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    I would add to this the issue about balancing what we are expected to do by occupation (your teacher, your boss) and what your peers and family expect. We are constantly connected but our attention is divided a lot more since we have access to everyone at the same time, or rather they have access to us. The big question is - when do you have time for yourself? martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016
    Really important to emphasize that the focus must be on the learning. Technology is a tool in the learning process and can make learning and learning situations possible that were not possible without technology. Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016
    (view changes)
    3:04 am
  3. page Challenges edited ... At least in a Swedish context this has been a major challenge over the last couple of decades.…
    ...
    At least in a Swedish context this has been a major challenge over the last couple of decades. This is not related directly to the digital transition but it's obvious that charter schools benefit from being more agile around what digital tools to use. They can respond faster to trends and set up digital learning platforms that are better designed to their selected group of students, giving them a market advantage at least in the short run. There is a risk that students in public schools will not benefit from technology development in the same way as their peers in charter schools. We're back to the issue about equity again I guess. martin.claesson Nov 20, 2016
    Navigating Digital Competence
    ...
    Nov 18, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Personalizing Learning
    Personalized learning refers to the range of educational programs, learning experiences, instructional approaches, and academic support strategies intended to address the specific learning needs, interests, aspirations, or cultural backgrounds of individual students. The increasing focus on customizing instruction to meet students’ unique needs is driving the development of new technologies that provide more learner choice and allow for differentiated content delivery. Advances such as online learning environments and adaptive learning technologies make it possible to support students’ individual pathways. One major barrier is a lack of infrastructure within school systems to support dissemination of personalized learning technologies at scale. Compounding the challenge is the notion that technology alone is not the whole solution; personalized learning efforts must incorporate effective pedagogy and include teachers in the development process.morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Rethinking the Roles of Educators
    Educators are increasingly expected to be adept at a variety of technology-based and other approaches for content delivery, learner support, and assessment; to collaborate with other teachers both inside and outside their schools; to routinely use digital strategies in their work with students; to act as guides and mentors in to promote student-centered learning; and to organize their own work and comply with administrative documentation and reporting requirements. Students add to these expectations through their own use of technology to socialize, organize, and informally learn on a daily basis. The integration of technology into everyday life is causing many educational thought leaders argue that institutions should be providing ways for students to continue to engage in learning activities, formal and informal, beyond the traditional school day. As this trend gathers steam, many institutions across the world are rethinking the primary responsibilities of educators. Related to these evolving expectations are changes in the ways educators engage in their own continuing professional development, much of which involves social media and online tools and resources. In a classroom without technology, a lecture can be an effective form of conveying information. But in a classroom with technology, the teacher is most valuable when he or she can guide exploration, digital reading and group discussion. This means less dicating and more focus on coaching and support. Instead of serving as data presenters, the future teachers will take the role as data synthesizers. morten.soby Nov 30, 2016ingrid.vinje Nov 4, 2016helle.mathiasen Nov 13, 2016stefan.reppe Nov 13, 2016marie.tangden Nov 14, 2016 helena.kvarnsell Nov 15, 2016jette.risgaard Nov 15, 2016 jakob.harder Nov 16, 2016 martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Teachers as consultants
    I believe we've had an increasing trend of teachers becoming lecturers, consultants and marketers for different kinds of commercial initiatives over the last couple of years. Tech companies want to have credible sales people when they enter the still fairly new market of education and schools. This is drawing attention to the use of digitial tools from the perspective of sales and profit rather than pedagogical development I would argue. Although this doesn't have to be a bad thing I believe we need better knowledge in schools and municipalities when it comes to choosing which IT-tools to use. The process of bringing digital tools to school, or rather bringing schools into a digital context, is a delicate process that can easily be hampered by bad purchasing decisions. We've seen that all to well in Stockholm. Added to that the high demand for certain teachers will probably open up for consultant agencies to offer teachers to schools in a fashion we haven't seen before. I'm surprised this hasn't happed yet to be honest. martin.claesson Nov 20, 2016
    [Editor's Note: Added here from RQ3.]
    Scaling Teaching Innovations
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Safety of Student Data
    Safety of student data has long been a concern in K-12 education, which is evident through legislation that has been passed to safeguard students and their personal data, such as the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act in the United States.106 As schools embrace ubiquitous technology, and more learning takes place online and in 1:1 settings, researchers see great potential to leverage these digital learning environments to mine data, which can be used to decipher trends in student behavior and create personalized software. Schools around the world are adopting cloud computing to support adaptive learning, promote cost-savings, and encourage collaboration, but sometimes the safety of student data is threatened when third-party vendors provide low-cost software as a service in return for access to student data that they then profit from.stefan.reppe Nov 13, 2016 helena.kvarnsell Nov 15, 2016 lars.lingman Nov 17, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016 ingrid.melve Nov 21, 2016
    (view changes)
    3:02 am
  4. page Challenges edited ... The challenge is that learning digital competence is different from applying digital tools in …
    ...
    The challenge is that learning digital competence is different from applying digital tools in specific subjects, such as language and science, in the same manner that learning to read is different from using text to explain mathematics. However, in many discussions, these topics are often confused. Some Scandinavian thought leaders believe teacher education should involve them learning how to teach digital competence to their students, while others believe the primary lesson should be in using the technologies themselves in the disciplines they are teaching. The confusion between the two ideas often hinders the creation of cohesive policy and teacher education curriculum. stefan.reppe Nov 13, 2016 helena.kvarnsell Nov 15, 2016jette.risgaard Nov 15, 2016 jakob.harder Nov 16, 2016 ellen.k.fossvoll Nov 16, 2016 lars.lingman Nov 17, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016
    Personalizing Learning
    ...
    the development process.process.morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Rethinking the Roles of Educators
    ...
    data synthesizers. ingrid.vinjemorten.soby Nov 30, 2016ingrid.vinje Nov 4,
    jakob.harder Nov 17, 2016 Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016 lars.lingman Nov 17, 2016 Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016 Within the eCampus program for higher education in Norway, we identified the gap between educators and ICT, and the "lack of ownership" for ICT use in higher education by educators as one of the biggest challenges ingrid.melve Nov 21, 2016
    Teachers as consultants
    (view changes)
    3:00 am
  5. page Challenges edited ... Major Changes in School Culture and Infrastructure I think adapting new pedagogies and new te…
    ...
    Major Changes in School Culture and Infrastructure
    I think adapting new pedagogies and new technologies requires major changes in the way schools organize their work. It cannot be assumed that all teachers are experts in ICT and computational thinking, so, if we wish to integrate ICT in learning processes, teaching and learning have to be organized so that there’s a lot of co-teaching, bigger groups, perhaps, but several teachers with different expertise. Students may study in flexible groups cross grades and disciplines. Thus the school infrastructure should support different needs and diverse and flexible learning spaces. Schools should also provide means to more independent studies alone or in groups at school or at home. To prevent exclusion students need to be more engaged in learning. In practice this means more individualized learning paths that are planned together with the students so that they make use of their strengths and interests. This means a major change from hierarchical organization structure to more flexible structure with teachers and students working together in dialogue.tiinsari Nov 16, 2016
    ...
    Nov 17, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    System Challenges The biggest challenge is now on the systems level, meaning both political understanding of how technologies might impact learning and teaching, and the institutional structures that hinder flexible transitions to using technologies in ways that move beyond the traditional classroom. Many teachers and classrooms are now making changes, but the system is not responding the same way to change. This also relates to the assessment system.~~~~
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Managing Knowledge Obsolescence
    Simply staying organized and current presents a challenge in a world where information, software tools, and devices proliferate at the rate they do today. New developments in technology are exciting and their potential for improving quality of life is enticing, but it can be overwhelming to attempt to keep up with even a few of the many new tools that are released. User-created content is exploding, giving rise to information, ideas, and opinions on all sorts of interesting topics, but following even some of the hundreds of available authorities means sifting through a mountain of information on a weekly or daily basis. There is a greater need than ever for effective tools and filters for finding, interpreting, organizing, and retrieving the data that is important to us.
    (view changes)
    2:57 am
  6. page Challenges edited ... This one will probably follow the general development in society. As the socioeconomical gaps …
    ...
    This one will probably follow the general development in society. As the socioeconomical gaps widen between geographical areas as well as race/ethnicity this will be a severe challenge in Sweden at least. martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016 lars.lingman Nov 17, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016
    Advancing Digital Equity
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    A rather old, but interesting article about the digital divide. It's not only about providing schools with tools. Kids from homes without the same resources as the rest, will learn "digital" as a second language.
    https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/technology-and-social-inclusion karinnygards Nov 21, 2016
    ...
    New models of education are bringing unprecedented competition to schools, especially for students whose needs are not being well served by the current system. Charter and online schools have particularly gained traction in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Scandinavia. According to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the US alone with more than 1.9 million students enrolled, compared to over 98,000 public schools where 49.4 million students are enrolled. Most US states also offer and encourage enrollment in online courses, and some states are requiring students complete them in order to graduate. Adding to this challenge is the fact that many students do not formally attend either type of school; the National Center for Education Statistic reports that nearly 3% of the school-age population was home schooled during the 2010-11 school year. Ninety-one percent of the parents of these children cited concern over the environments of tradition and charter schools when asked about their choice. For school leaders and policy makers, the challenge is to meet such competition head on, offering high-quality alternatives to students who need them. As new platforms emerge, there is a growing need to frankly evaluate models and determine how to best support collaboration, interaction, deep learning experiences, and assessment at scale.helle.mathiasen Nov 13, 2016
    Creating Systemic Policy and Synergies for Better Learning
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Expanding Access
    The global drive to increase the number of students participating in undergraduate education is placing pressure across the system. The oft-cited relationship between earning potential and educational attainment plus the clear impact of an educated society on the growth of the middle class is pushing governments to encourage more and more students to enter universities and colleges. In many countries, however, the population of students prepared for undergraduate study is already enrolled — expanding access means extending it to students who may not have the academic background to be successful without additional support. Many in universities feel that these institutions do not have sufficient time and resources to help this set of students.helle.mathiasen Nov 13, 2016
    Fostering Digital Citizenship
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Gaps Between Technology and Pedagogy
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Another ('old') problem is BYOD especially in Primary Schools. As it of course is the cheapest way of having access to devices in the classroom (as students themselves have to bring their own device into school, so the school does not have to buy devices), it also creates challenges for the teacher - especially the teacher who is insecure or not actually really interested in new technology. Students might bring in different devices (iPads, Chromebooks, Windows devices etc.) which are not compatible when students are supposed to collaborate and exchange files in an easy way etc.. It also makes it more difficult for the teacher to choose which apps to use when students work on different platforms. The teacher will have to work with the lowest possible common denominator which may or may not support the wanted pedagogy. In this way technology may be a step backwards instead of the huge step forward it could be for teachers and students who can easily be innovative and creative when collaborating with peers. jette.risgaard Nov 15, 2016
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Implementing Knowledge and Success from Other Parts of Society
    Nordic schools do not look to practices from other parts of society and industry as often as they should. Modernising education will require school leaders to analyse how other sectors have adapted to remain relevant, and also to learn from their mistakes. For example, the music industry underwent a complete overhaul when applications like iTunes U and Spotify emerged. Scandinavian schools have an opportunity to refine their organisational models to remain more agile. In the business of education, the consumers are the students, and there is a need to better cater to them as their expectations and behaviours evolve.jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016
    Integrating Technology in Teacher Education
    Teacher training still does not acknowledge the fact that digital media literacy continues its rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. Despite the widespread agreement on the importance of digital competence, training in the digital-supported teaching methods is still too uncommon in teacher education and in the preparation of teachers. Teachers require extensive exposure to ICT to be able to evaluate and choose the most appropriate tools and resources. This need to be integrated in the teacher education, as "one-off traing is not sufficient. ingrid.vinje Nov 4, 2016 jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016 ellen.k.fossvoll Nov 15, 2016LREM Nov 15, 2016 Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016 lars.lingman Nov 17, 2016 ingrid.melve Nov 21, 2016
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    One
    ...
    Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    We will not see the full effect of technology in school until a significant part of the current crop of teachers have retired. martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016 I wish we would THEN see the full effect of technology in schools. However, with teacher education NOT focusing on 21st century skills - including the use of technology - newly educated teachers will not reform pedagogy. Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016
    Many, if not the majority of in-service teachers, including the more 'mature' teachers, are very eager to be upskilled on 21st century skills and integration of technology, but professional development is slow and new more progressive methods seems to be urgently important. Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016
    (view changes)
    2:53 am
  7. page Trends edited ... Another challenge is the need for teachers who can actually teach coding. We cannot rely on ge…
    ...
    Another challenge is the need for teachers who can actually teach coding. We cannot rely on getting help from the private sector/ICT companies. It might be a good marketing gig with the occasional show up in schools with experts/technicians from private ICT companies, but not something you can count on for all classes every year. I'm sure that no company will make their expert available for schools at all times when needed without schools having to pay. SO: Are we looking into a massive in-service training for teachers (and will that be a succes?) and/or are we looking at a new subject at Teacher Training Colleges and when will they be ready to teach coding at schools?jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016 Coding as a literacy may be importent for some students but the trend in Denmark is to look at technology understanding in a larger perspective. jakob.harder Nov 16, 2016 I agree, it should be more about computational thinking, understanding and creating algorithms, problem solving. I'm sure, in a few years there'll be computers that can produce the code for whatever purpose we need. tiinsari Nov 16, 2016 Computational thinking and learning will pave the way to a better interest in STEM subject per se, which will be an immense advantage as the need for STEM graduates is only accelerating over the next decade Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016 I agree that codint should be introduced in school, and I think that it could be a choice next to foreign languages. The important part here is that everyone should not have to do the same. Coding can be a robot, a computer or a Sphero. Coding should be fun and challenging, that way more students will be interested in what is behind the computer, and the apps we use. http://www.sphero.com/ Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Collaborative Learning
    ...
    18, 2016 stefanmorten.soby Nov 30, 2016stefan Nov 20,
    Following up from the section on collaborative learning, I believe that CSCL also deserves to be mentioned. Within the CSCL research community, the main focus is on how people learn in the context of collaborative activity. Students collaborating today, use to a large extent technology to facilitate their collaboration. The potential technology have to connect people in original ways is understood as a stimulus for CSCL. As research on CSCL is developing, it is becoming evident that the whole concept of learning requires a transformaion. We are seeing significant changes in being a student, as learning has moved from being a merely individually programmed endeavor, into learning with and in groups in a problem-based or inquiry-based situation. Research shows that students integrated into CSCL appear to participate more in the learning process (Fjermestad, 2004), report higher levels of learning and to make better decisions (Hertz-Lazarowitz & Bar-Natan, 2002) than when working alone (Järvela et al. 2015). Knowledge about CSCL is important as the design of collaborative learning environments must ensure that collaborative learning takes place. If not, we might risk forcing students to use technology they have no use for. ingrid.vinje Nov 4, 2016
    Deeper Learning Approaches
    (view changes)
    2:50 am
  8. page Trends edited ... Blended learning in middle and high school needs to be a combination of attendance and working…
    ...
    Blended learning in middle and high school needs to be a combination of attendance and working at home. The reason why there is scepticism towards MOOCs is the low completion number they get. Students need feedback and incentive to participated and complete courses. They need the teacher coaching and encouraging. That will not change in my opinion. But with the use of technology testing should be easier and when the student is ready, not the teacher. Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016
    Changes in the Methods of Assessment
    ...
    Nov 21, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    People are talking a lot about it but I'm not sure it will happen. It's still an easier ride for a teacher to be mainly summative than continously formative. That goes for managers and principals too... martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016
    Coding as a Literacy
    Coding refers to a set of rules that computers understand and can take the form of numerous languages, such as HTML, JavaScript, and PHP. Many educators perceive coding as a way to stimulate computational thinking: the skills required to learn coding combine deep computer science knowledge with creativity and problem-solving. Code.org recently projected that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computing jobs but only 400,000 computer science students to fill them. To better prepare learners from a young age, an increasing number of school leaders and technologists are making the case for embedding coding into primary and secondary education curricula. Schools across Nordic countries are developing coding programs in which students collaboratively design websites, develop educational games and apps, and design solutions to challenges by modeling and prototyping new products. Additionally, the advent of user-friendly tools including Raspberry PI, Scratch, and LegoNXT is making it easier than ever for students to begin learning to code.helle.mathiasen Nov 13, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    ...
    Nov 15, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Coding will in 5 years be close to "real" language like danish or english - intelligent and adaptable ways to program for your needs. iOS SIRI, Google Now, MS Cortana is just the beginning.Should everyone learn to code?LREM Nov 15, 2016
    Another challenge is the need for teachers who can actually teach coding. We cannot rely on getting help from the private sector/ICT companies. It might be a good marketing gig with the occasional show up in schools with experts/technicians from private ICT companies, but not something you can count on for all classes every year. I'm sure that no company will make their expert available for schools at all times when needed without schools having to pay. SO: Are we looking into a massive in-service training for teachers (and will that be a succes?) and/or are we looking at a new subject at Teacher Training Colleges and when will they be ready to teach coding at schools?jette.risgaard Nov 14, 2016 Coding as a literacy may be importent for some students but the trend in Denmark is to look at technology understanding in a larger perspective. jakob.harder Nov 16, 2016 I agree, it should be more about computational thinking, understanding and creating algorithms, problem solving. I'm sure, in a few years there'll be computers that can produce the code for whatever purpose we need. tiinsari Nov 16, 2016 Computational thinking and learning will pave the way to a better interest in STEM subject per se, which will be an immense advantage as the need for STEM graduates is only accelerating over the next decade Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016 I agree that codint should be introduced in school, and I think that it could be a choice next to foreign languages. The important part here is that everyone should not have to do the same. Coding can be a robot, a computer or a Sphero. Coding should be fun and challenging, that way more students will be interested in what is behind the computer, and the apps we use. http://www.sphero.com/ Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Nov 18, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    (view changes)
    2:49 am
  9. page Trends edited ... There is a growing emphasis in primary and secondary education on deeper learning approaches, …
    ...
    There is a growing emphasis in primary and secondary education on deeper learning approaches, defined by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation as the mastery of content that engages students in critical thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, and self-directed learning. In order to remain motivated, students need to be able to grasp how new knowledge and skills will impact the world around them. Pedagogical approaches that shift the dynamic from passive to active learning allow students to develop ideas themselves from new information and take control of how they engage with a subject. These approaches include problem-based learning, project-based learning, challenge-based learning, and inquiry-based learning, which encourage creative problem-solving and actively implementing solutions. As the enabling role of technologies in learning crystalizes, educators are leveraging these tools to connect the curriculum with real-life applications. ellen.k.fossvoll Nov 15, 2016LREM Nov 15, 2016 [[user:stefan|1479332318]morten.soby Nov 17, 2016 stefan Nov 20, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    At least I hope so even if can see few signs of it from my daughter's school... martin.claesson Nov 17, 2016 Kirsten.Panton Nov 17, 2016
    ...
    Nov 18, 2016morten.soby Nov 30, 2016
    Rethink undervising and develop guidance platforms, so a teacher synchronously can give verbal instructions based on students' synchronously written work. For example, the 10 students individually work with a math assignment, a translation job or an essay assignment in each of their cambre separé. The teacher can follow the individual student's work process and both orally and in writing intervene. And also invitetere the students, the teacher believes can have a common instruction into common shared space and provide a common indstruks before students return to their virtual individual workspaces.
    Åbn i Google Oversæt
    (view changes)
    2:47 am

More